It's me.

curlyinsaneguy:

This totally sucks.
I’ve been neglecting my video editing/creating tendencies, but now I totally have a great idea for a series!
The problem: My idea is super super effects driven.
So, tomorrow I will start speed-learning effects.
I’ll be leaning through the tutorials on Adobes website along…

Umm yeah FilmRiot on YouTube
FreddieW and RocketJumo do some good bts
And just search YouTube man depends what you’re looking for!

starkid99:

The New ‘New Wave’ of Today?

A while back I read an article on the group of four filmmakers who were dubbed the ‘New Wave’ of Cinema in the 1970’s saying how they changed cinema forever and collecting something near 38 Oscar nominations between them.

That was nearly 50 years ago and cinema, and the audience have changed immensely. So who would be the ‘New Wave’ of the 21st Century? Who are the four filmmakers that pop into your head when you think of the best directors in 2014? I think it’s safe to guess that the majority would think of at least one of these four.

I could make a whole other category of film makers for the time between Spielberg’s heyday and now that could include: Robert Rodriquez, Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright and Kevin Smith or another including James Cameron, David Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson and Peter Jackson or Tim Burton however I’m talking as recent as film goes and the directors that have had a similar impact as the New Wave did in the ‘70’s. 

Francis Ford Coppola is most famously known for his masterpiece and follow up: The Godfather and The Godfather Part II… There was The Godfather Part III as well but not many people know about that one. David O’Russell is most famously known for his unofficial trilogy that he has released over the last few years: The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle. Another similarity is the highly controversial and troubled war film productions of both Coppola’s ‘Apocalypse Now’ and O’Russel’s ‘The Three Kings’. Both directors also sharing a key trademark of brilliant period cinematography and getting unbelievably strong performances out of their cast, (here’s looking at you Marlon Brando and Jennifer Lawrence) making them stars and resulting in some unforgettable human stories. 

George Lucas, love him or hate him, is undeniably one of the most influential director’s on the planet and undeniably genius. His product Star Wars has stretched it’s influence into every form of Pop Culture possible, like many of the ‘New Wave’s’ films, and is still my favourite film of all time today. JJ Abrams, needless to say shares similarities now announced and well under way with Star Wars Episode VII. He is also known for his wild imagination, lens flares and sometimes to some people ruining a beloved franchise with a sequel. 

Steven Spielberg is one of the first men behind a camera to become as famous as the stars he puts on screen; He is a household name even today still churning out strong oscar nominated films. He brought cinema out of a dark place and made it fun again during the high point of the Hollywood glamour years. Some might argue that he be the best Director not only of his time but of all time. That’s where Christopher Nolan comes in. Nolan took a franchise that had been put through the ringer and not come out well and not only turned in a fantastic film but started a revolution of the way films are made and watched. Spielberg and Nolan both love to test the limits and boundaries of cinema and you can tell in their work that they to love to watch films as much as they do making them. They also share no shortage of twists, turns and moments of pure weightlessness in their work and with no shortage of demand for films from both these directors, they are both deserving. 

Martin Scorsese once quoted that the next Scorsese would have to be Wes Anderson, so this one is not up for debate. However in saying that, it’s not like it’s not deserved. If you have ever seen a Wes Anderson film, which few sadly have, you will know it is his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. If you have ever seen a Martin Scorsese film, which is sad if you haven’t, you will know it his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. Whether it’s Bill Murray or Robert De Niro, a centred tripod or a tracking shot or a vibrantly coloured hotel or a shadow soaked city, you know that it’s going to be a good one. 

There is an endless amount of directors and films out there, some good and some bad. There is also an endless number of groupings you could do with: The ‘Pioneers’ led of Charlie Chaplin or George Méliès or the generation coming just before the ‘New Wave’ with team captain Alfred Hitchcock. This could change quickly by a new kid on the block or a complete career turn around (M Night) but until the new generation rises this is what we have and I think it is safe to say that we are in good hands. 

By Bryson Howe

starkid99:

The New ‘New Wave’ of Today?

A while back I read an article on the group of four filmmakers who were dubbed the ‘New Wave’ of Cinema in the 1970’s saying how they changed cinema forever and collecting something near 38 Oscar nominations between them.

That was nearly 50 years ago and cinema, and the audience have changed immensely. So who would be the ‘New Wave’ of the 21st Century? Who are the four filmmakers that pop into your head when you think of the best directors in 2014? I think it’s safe to guess that the majority would think of at least one of these four.

I could make a whole other category of film makers for the time between Spielberg’s heyday and now that could include: Robert Rodriquez, Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright and Kevin Smith or another including James Cameron, David Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson and Peter Jackson or Tim Burton however I’m talking as recent as film goes and the directors that have had a similar impact as the New Wave did in the ‘70’s.

Francis Ford Coppola is most famously known for his masterpiece and follow up: The Godfather and The Godfather Part II… There was The Godfather Part III as well but not many people know about that one. David O’Russell is most famously known for his unofficial trilogy that he has released over the last few years: The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle. Another similarity is the highly controversial and troubled war film productions of both Coppola’s ‘Apocalypse Now’ and O’Russel’s ‘The Three Kings’. Both directors also sharing a key trademark of brilliant period cinematography and getting unbelievably strong performances out of their cast, (here’s looking at you Marlon Brando and Jennifer Lawrence) making them stars and resulting in some unforgettable human stories.

George Lucas, love him or hate him, is undeniably one of the most influential director’s on the planet and undeniably genius. His product Star Wars has stretched it’s influence into every form of Pop Culture possible, like many of the ‘New Wave’s’ films, and is still my favourite film of all time today. JJ Abrams, needless to say shares similarities now announced and well under way with Star Wars Episode VII. He is also known for his wild imagination, lens flares and sometimes to some people ruining a beloved franchise with a sequel.

Steven Spielberg is one of the first men behind a camera to become as famous as the stars he puts on screen; He is a household name even today still churning out strong oscar nominated films. He brought cinema out of a dark place and made it fun again during the high point of the Hollywood glamour years. Some might argue that he be the best Director not only of his time but of all time. That’s where Christopher Nolan comes in. Nolan took a franchise that had been put through the ringer and not come out well and not only turned in a fantastic film but started a revolution of the way films are made and watched. Spielberg and Nolan both love to test the limits and boundaries of cinema and you can tell in their work that they to love to watch films as much as they do making them. They also share no shortage of twists, turns and moments of pure weightlessness in their work and with no shortage of demand for films from both these directors, they are both deserving.

Martin Scorsese once quoted that the next Scorsese would have to be Wes Anderson, so this one is not up for debate. However in saying that, it’s not like it’s not deserved. If you have ever seen a Wes Anderson film, which few sadly have, you will know it is his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. If you have ever seen a Martin Scorsese film, which is sad if you haven’t, you will know it his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. Whether it’s Bill Murray or Robert De Niro, a centred tripod or a tracking shot or a vibrantly coloured hotel or a shadow soaked city, you know that it’s going to be a good one.

There is an endless amount of directors and films out there, some good and some bad. There is also an endless number of groupings you could do with: The ‘Pioneers’ led of Charlie Chaplin or George Méliès or the generation coming just before the ‘New Wave’ with team captain Alfred Hitchcock. This could change quickly by a new kid on the block or a complete career turn around (M Night) but until the new generation rises this is what we have and I think it is safe to say that we are in good hands.

By Bryson Howe

The New ‘New Wave’ of Today?

A while back I read an article on the group of four filmmakers who were dubbed the ‘New Wave’ of Cinema in the 1970’s saying how they changed cinema forever and collecting something near 38 Oscar nominations between them.

That was nearly 50 years ago and cinema, and the audience have changed immensely. So who would be the ‘New Wave’ of the 21st Century? Who are the four filmmakers that pop into your head when you think of the best directors in 2014? I think it’s safe to guess that the majority would think of at least one of these four.

I could make a whole other category of film makers for the time between Spielberg’s heyday and now that could include: Robert Rodriquez, Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright and Kevin Smith or another including James Cameron, David Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson and Peter Jackson or Tim Burton however I’m talking as recent as film goes and the directors that have had a similar impact as the New Wave did in the ‘70’s. 

Francis Ford Coppola is most famously known for his masterpiece and follow up: The Godfather and The Godfather Part II… There was The Godfather Part III as well but not many people know about that one. David O’Russell is most famously known for his unofficial trilogy that he has released over the last few years: The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle. Another similarity is the highly controversial and troubled war film productions of both Coppola’s ‘Apocalypse Now’ and O’Russel’s ‘The Three Kings’. Both directors also sharing a key trademark of brilliant period cinematography and getting unbelievably strong performances out of their cast, (here’s looking at you Marlon Brando and Jennifer Lawrence) making them stars and resulting in some unforgettable human stories. 

George Lucas, love him or hate him, is undeniably one of the most influential director’s on the planet and undeniably genius. His product Star Wars has stretched it’s influence into every form of Pop Culture possible, like many of the ‘New Wave’s’ films, and is still my favourite film of all time today. JJ Abrams, needless to say shares similarities now announced and well under way with Star Wars Episode VII. He is also known for his wild imagination, lens flares and sometimes to some people ruining a beloved franchise with a sequel. 

Steven Spielberg is one of the first men behind a camera to become as famous as the stars he puts on screen; He is a household name even today still churning out strong oscar nominated films. He brought cinema out of a dark place and made it fun again during the high point of the Hollywood glamour years. Some might argue that he be the best Director not only of his time but of all time. That’s where Christopher Nolan comes in. Nolan took a franchise that had been put through the ringer and not come out well and not only turned in a fantastic film but started a revolution of the way films are made and watched. Spielberg and Nolan both love to test the limits and boundaries of cinema and you can tell in their work that they to love to watch films as much as they do making them. They also share no shortage of twists, turns and moments of pure weightlessness in their work and with no shortage of demand for films from both these directors, they are both deserving. 

Martin Scorsese once quoted that the next Scorsese would have to be Wes Anderson, so this one is not up for debate. However in saying that, it’s not like it’s not deserved. If you have ever seen a Wes Anderson film, which few sadly have, you will know it is his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. If you have ever seen a Martin Scorsese film, which is sad if you haven’t, you will know it his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. Whether it’s Bill Murray or Robert De Niro, a centred tripod or a tracking shot or a vibrantly coloured hotel or a shadow soaked city, you know that it’s going to be a good one. 

There is an endless amount of directors and films out there, some good and some bad. There is also an endless number of groupings you could do with: The ‘Pioneers’ led of Charlie Chaplin or George Méliès or the generation coming just before the ‘New Wave’ with team captain Alfred Hitchcock. This could change quickly by a new kid on the block or a complete career turn around (M Night) but until the new generation rises this is what we have and I think it is safe to say that we are in good hands. 

By Bryson Howe

The New ‘New Wave’ of Today?

A while back I read an article on the group of four filmmakers who were dubbed the ‘New Wave’ of Cinema in the 1970’s saying how they changed cinema forever and collecting something near 38 Oscar nominations between them.

That was nearly 50 years ago and cinema, and the audience have changed immensely. So who would be the ‘New Wave’ of the 21st Century? Who are the four filmmakers that pop into your head when you think of the best directors in 2014? I think it’s safe to guess that the majority would think of at least one of these four.

I could make a whole other category of film makers for the time between Spielberg’s heyday and now that could include: Robert Rodriquez, Quentin Tarantino, Edgar Wright and Kevin Smith or another including James Cameron, David Fincher, Paul Thomas Anderson and Peter Jackson or Tim Burton however I’m talking as recent as film goes and the directors that have had a similar impact as the New Wave did in the ‘70’s.

Francis Ford Coppola is most famously known for his masterpiece and follow up: The Godfather and The Godfather Part II… There was The Godfather Part III as well but not many people know about that one. David O’Russell is most famously known for his unofficial trilogy that he has released over the last few years: The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle. Another similarity is the highly controversial and troubled war film productions of both Coppola’s ‘Apocalypse Now’ and O’Russel’s ‘The Three Kings’. Both directors also sharing a key trademark of brilliant period cinematography and getting unbelievably strong performances out of their cast, (here’s looking at you Marlon Brando and Jennifer Lawrence) making them stars and resulting in some unforgettable human stories.

George Lucas, love him or hate him, is undeniably one of the most influential director’s on the planet and undeniably genius. His product Star Wars has stretched it’s influence into every form of Pop Culture possible, like many of the ‘New Wave’s’ films, and is still my favourite film of all time today. JJ Abrams, needless to say shares similarities now announced and well under way with Star Wars Episode VII. He is also known for his wild imagination, lens flares and sometimes to some people ruining a beloved franchise with a sequel.

Steven Spielberg is one of the first men behind a camera to become as famous as the stars he puts on screen; He is a household name even today still churning out strong oscar nominated films. He brought cinema out of a dark place and made it fun again during the high point of the Hollywood glamour years. Some might argue that he be the best Director not only of his time but of all time. That’s where Christopher Nolan comes in. Nolan took a franchise that had been put through the ringer and not come out well and not only turned in a fantastic film but started a revolution of the way films are made and watched. Spielberg and Nolan both love to test the limits and boundaries of cinema and you can tell in their work that they to love to watch films as much as they do making them. They also share no shortage of twists, turns and moments of pure weightlessness in their work and with no shortage of demand for films from both these directors, they are both deserving.

Martin Scorsese once quoted that the next Scorsese would have to be Wes Anderson, so this one is not up for debate. However in saying that, it’s not like it’s not deserved. If you have ever seen a Wes Anderson film, which few sadly have, you will know it is his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. If you have ever seen a Martin Scorsese film, which is sad if you haven’t, you will know it his by his trademark cast, camera techniques and consistent cinematography. Whether it’s Bill Murray or Robert De Niro, a centred tripod or a tracking shot or a vibrantly coloured hotel or a shadow soaked city, you know that it’s going to be a good one.

There is an endless amount of directors and films out there, some good and some bad. There is also an endless number of groupings you could do with: The ‘Pioneers’ led of Charlie Chaplin or George Méliès or the generation coming just before the ‘New Wave’ with team captain Alfred Hitchcock. This could change quickly by a new kid on the block or a complete career turn around (M Night) but until the new generation rises this is what we have and I think it is safe to say that we are in good hands.

By Bryson Howe

starkid99:

Godzilla (2014)
Director: Gareth Edwards

We are just over the halfway point for the year and boy has it been a slow one!

I have seen quite a few movies this year, not as many as I’d have liked, but overall the films that have been released have been incredibly disappointing. But in saying that… Godzilla. Is. Awesome.

I loved the 1954 Godzilla (Gojira) Japanese Classic and was actually one of the first films I truly loved. I really fell for the idea of a monster with a heart and throughout my movie-watching life I have been influenced by the original. I, like all true Godzilla fans, have seen many of the preceding films and laughed when he fought Mothra and cringed when he was with Matthew Broderick but this one truly deserves to be on the same podium as the original.

I heard about this when it was first announced at Comic Con a few years back and followed it closely and eagerly. The trailers and promotions with all the posters and art they released just excited me even more and at the start of the year this was right at the top of my must see of 2014 list. I saw this, begrudgingly, in 3D and while it wasn’t spectacular it did a fair job and I really can’t complain. I would even go as far as saying a few scenes may have actually benefitted from it. 

The film itself is a gorgeous blend of handheld grittiness and big swooping blockbuster-esque shots that just made the whole production feel as big as the King of the Monsters himself. And he is big! Godzilla is huge and although not exactly the star of the show, unforgettable. 

However, I didn’t leave the theatre without complaints. Through all the giddy moments and an ending as good as The Usual Suspects, Godzilla isn’t the star of the show. He is literally only in it for probably 40 minutes. The original ‘MUTO’ monsters he is battling have the next biggest part of screen time as underwhelming as they are and then the Humans do. And no, not Walter White… Humans that we don’t care about. That’s where this film lacks. I couldn’t shake the feeling this was just a bigger budget remake of the Directors previous film Monsters. 

But in saying all that, I loved the film! Best of the year so far? Hell Yes! Best Godzilla Film? No. Oscar Winner? Probably not, maybe a few technical nominations. Highly recommended to people who don’t hate big budget blockbusters and are just looking for an awesome, entertaining experience at the cinema. 

Rating: 3.8/5

starkid99:

Godzilla (2014)
Director: Gareth Edwards

We are just over the halfway point for the year and boy has it been a slow one!

I have seen quite a few movies this year, not as many as I’d have liked, but overall the films that have been released have been incredibly disappointing. But in saying that… Godzilla. Is. Awesome.

I loved the 1954 Godzilla (Gojira) Japanese Classic and was actually one of the first films I truly loved. I really fell for the idea of a monster with a heart and throughout my movie-watching life I have been influenced by the original. I, like all true Godzilla fans, have seen many of the preceding films and laughed when he fought Mothra and cringed when he was with Matthew Broderick but this one truly deserves to be on the same podium as the original.

I heard about this when it was first announced at Comic Con a few years back and followed it closely and eagerly. The trailers and promotions with all the posters and art they released just excited me even more and at the start of the year this was right at the top of my must see of 2014 list. I saw this, begrudgingly, in 3D and while it wasn’t spectacular it did a fair job and I really can’t complain. I would even go as far as saying a few scenes may have actually benefitted from it.

The film itself is a gorgeous blend of handheld grittiness and big swooping blockbuster-esque shots that just made the whole production feel as big as the King of the Monsters himself. And he is big! Godzilla is huge and although not exactly the star of the show, unforgettable.

However, I didn’t leave the theatre without complaints. Through all the giddy moments and an ending as good as The Usual Suspects, Godzilla isn’t the star of the show. He is literally only in it for probably 40 minutes. The original ‘MUTO’ monsters he is battling have the next biggest part of screen time as underwhelming as they are and then the Humans do. And no, not Walter White… Humans that we don’t care about. That’s where this film lacks. I couldn’t shake the feeling this was just a bigger budget remake of the Directors previous film Monsters.

But in saying all that, I loved the film! Best of the year so far? Hell Yes! Best Godzilla Film? No. Oscar Winner? Probably not, maybe a few technical nominations. Highly recommended to people who don’t hate big budget blockbusters and are just looking for an awesome, entertaining experience at the cinema.

Rating: 3.8/5

Godzilla (2014)
Director: Gareth Edwards

We are just over the halfway point for the year and boy has it been a slow one!

I have seen quite a few movies this year, not as many as I’d have liked, but overall the films that have been released have been incredibly disappointing. But in saying that… Godzilla. Is. Awesome.

I loved the 1954 Godzilla (Gojira) Japanese Classic and was actually one of the first films I truly loved. I really fell for the idea of a monster with a heart and throughout my movie-watching life I have been influenced by the original. I, like all true Godzilla fans, have seen many of the preceding films and laughed when he fought Mothra and cringed when he was with Matthew Broderick but this one truly deserves to be on the same podium as the original.

I heard about this when it was first announced at Comic Con a few years back and followed it closely and eagerly. The trailers and promotions with all the posters and art they released just excited me even more and at the start of the year this was right at the top of my must see of 2014 list. I saw this, begrudgingly, in 3D and while it wasn’t spectacular it did a fair job and I really can’t complain. I would even go as far as saying a few scenes may have actually benefitted from it. 

The film itself is a gorgeous blend of handheld grittiness and big swooping blockbuster-esque shots that just made the whole production feel as big as the King of the Monsters himself. And he is big! Godzilla is huge and although not exactly the star of the show, unforgettable. 

However, I didn’t leave the theatre without complaints. Through all the giddy moments and an ending as good as The Usual Suspects, Godzilla isn’t the star of the show. He is literally only in it for probably 40 minutes. The original ‘MUTO’ monsters he is battling have the next biggest part of screen time as underwhelming as they are and then the Humans do. And no, not Walter White… Humans that we don’t care about. That’s where this film lacks. I couldn’t shake the feeling this was just a bigger budget remake of the Directors previous film Monsters. 

But in saying all that, I loved the film! Best of the year so far? Hell Yes! Best Godzilla Film? No. Oscar Winner? Probably not, maybe a few technical nominations. Highly recommended to people who don’t hate big budget blockbusters and are just looking for an awesome, entertaining experience at the cinema. 

Rating: 3.8/5

Godzilla (2014)
Director: Gareth Edwards

We are just over the halfway point for the year and boy has it been a slow one!

I have seen quite a few movies this year, not as many as I’d have liked, but overall the films that have been released have been incredibly disappointing. But in saying that… Godzilla. Is. Awesome.

I loved the 1954 Godzilla (Gojira) Japanese Classic and was actually one of the first films I truly loved. I really fell for the idea of a monster with a heart and throughout my movie-watching life I have been influenced by the original. I, like all true Godzilla fans, have seen many of the preceding films and laughed when he fought Mothra and cringed when he was with Matthew Broderick but this one truly deserves to be on the same podium as the original.

I heard about this when it was first announced at Comic Con a few years back and followed it closely and eagerly. The trailers and promotions with all the posters and art they released just excited me even more and at the start of the year this was right at the top of my must see of 2014 list. I saw this, begrudgingly, in 3D and while it wasn’t spectacular it did a fair job and I really can’t complain. I would even go as far as saying a few scenes may have actually benefitted from it.

The film itself is a gorgeous blend of handheld grittiness and big swooping blockbuster-esque shots that just made the whole production feel as big as the King of the Monsters himself. And he is big! Godzilla is huge and although not exactly the star of the show, unforgettable.

However, I didn’t leave the theatre without complaints. Through all the giddy moments and an ending as good as The Usual Suspects, Godzilla isn’t the star of the show. He is literally only in it for probably 40 minutes. The original ‘MUTO’ monsters he is battling have the next biggest part of screen time as underwhelming as they are and then the Humans do. And no, not Walter White… Humans that we don’t care about. That’s where this film lacks. I couldn’t shake the feeling this was just a bigger budget remake of the Directors previous film Monsters.

But in saying all that, I loved the film! Best of the year so far? Hell Yes! Best Godzilla Film? No. Oscar Winner? Probably not, maybe a few technical nominations. Highly recommended to people who don’t hate big budget blockbusters and are just looking for an awesome, entertaining experience at the cinema.

Rating: 3.8/5

theladybadass:

Assassin of Youth (1937) is an exploitation film about the dangerous effects of marijuana.

nerdofwar:

Arya, “they look like they’ve been murdered”The Hound, “they look like cunts”

nerdofwar:

Arya, “they look like they’ve been murdered”
The Hound, “they look like cunts”

jamesbranscome:

Going for an #italianhorror #giallo vibe for the new Shivering Window music. Not pictured: J & B Whiskey. #musicvideo #70shorror #video #film #director #filmmaker #horror #cemetery #indiefilm #indierock

jamesbranscome:

Going for an #italianhorror #giallo vibe for the new Shivering Window music. Not pictured: J & B Whiskey. #musicvideo #70shorror #video #film #director #filmmaker #horror #cemetery #indiefilm #indierock

siblingcinema:

By the time it was released Prometheus had been intensely anticipated, endlessly hyped, and massively marketed for years. Word spread like wildfire: Ridley Scott was making a prequel to Alien.  As production carried on more information began to leak. It came to light that Prometheus wasn’t just a prequel for the Alien movies that we’ve seen but rather a primer for the entire Ridley-verse as a whole. This ambitious behemoth was to be the Origin of Species for all of Ridley Scott’s visionary futuristic works. The studio launched one of the largest and most complicated viral marketing campaigns I have ever seen. They filmed and released phony TED talks, visual e-mails, investment portfolios for fictional corporations, product profiles, videos outlining the advantages of current model year artificial humanoids… the list goes on.  Truly this was to be one of the most momentous events in recent filmmaking.


What happened? The movie basically flopped, not even making back it’s $130 million dollar budget domestically, and those that DID see it (myself included) came away confused and disappointed with what they had just experienced. So I ask again: What happened?
Damon. Lindelof.


I hate Damon Lindelof. I hate Damon Lindelof so much that the reason I asked to be added to this blog my brother and sister had been running was specifically to write and post a piece entitled “Damon Lindelof is the Herpes of the Film Industry.” I hate Damon Lindelof so much that it actually noticeably affects how much I LOVE J.J. Abrams – a man whom I plan to name my first-born son after – for having giving him his initial break writing for the show LOST. Damon Lindelof is a man who has literally said, “People hate getting answers.” No, Damon, they hate YOUR answers because you are a no talent hack who couldn’t write a satisfying conclusion if your shiny little head depended on it. But I digress… 
Damon Lindelof, being the bright and shiny man of the moment, was brought on as the head writer and executive producer for the film. His function was (or at least very much SHOULD have been) as kind of a script doctor/story polisher for the unquestionable genius of Ridley Scott who had already developed the entire story in his mind. However as the process went on, Damon pushed and changed and warped the story more, somehow convincing the aging director that ‘less is more’ and they could seek true exposition and resolution in the sequel. This is of course without the consideration that if they leave too many open questions – and thus empty seats – they might never make it to a sequel. So how did Prometheus go from a disappointing, open-ended cinema experience to one of my favorite, most analyzed, and deeply interesting films? The answer is a little research and Prometheus: Giftbearer.

Giftbearer is a FanEdit by an Internet user called Severian. In this recut he has completely overhauled the original film to address some of it biggest weaknesses. He added nearly 15 minutes of bonus footage compiled from the deleted scenes, viral videos, and the online marketing site. He also re-sequenced several scenes, cut out superfluous or impossible actions, and reduced unnecessary or redundant character development/flaw exposition to create an overall more engaging and cohesive narrative experience. Basically he de-lindelof’d the film as much as humanly possible. 
What is honestly mind blowing to me is that these added scenes existed and were not included in the theatrical release to begin with. For example in Giftbearer there is a scene between Vickers and Janek (which is perhaps the best scene for the limitless Idris Elba in the entire movie) that POINT FOR POINT, NOTE FOR NOTE explains the complication and plot of the situation that they are experiencing. It answers SO MANY QUESTIONS that lingered and ruined the movie for so many people. AND THEY SHOT IT! THEY HAD IT! They had that scene and withheld the resolution from the viewer ON PURPOSE. Who does that sound like to you?

They’ve announced Prometheus 2 (finally and awesomely) so it looks like we’ll finally get those answers we were looking for. In FACT not only have they announced that Prometheus 2 is coming free from Lindelof’s interference but they have employed Michael Green to write it. For those of you tragically uninformed: Michael Green is the creator, writer, and producer of the single greatest television show of all time Kings. I know, you’ve never heard of it. But this was a show, a modernization of King David’s tale that was literally and explicitly cancelled for being “too smart for television.” NBC decided to cancel the show as it reached the “wrong demographic” of informed and intelligent viewers. Had this show been on HBO or AMC it would have run six seasons. It’s available on Amazon and I dare you to watch just the first episode and tell me it isn’t the most compelling television you’ve ever seen. BUT I DIGRESS AGAIN!

I’ve gone too long to actually get into the story of Prometheus in this post but rest assured it’s coming. Take this time to download Prometheus: Giftbearer and watch it for yourself. Because soon I’ll be back to tell you about the story that you never saw and the world that it created. 
-Andrew

siblingcinema:

By the time it was released Prometheus had been intensely anticipated, endlessly hyped, and massively marketed for years. Word spread like wildfire: Ridley Scott was making a prequel to Alien.  As production carried on more information began to leak. It came to light that Prometheus wasn’t just a prequel for the Alien movies that we’ve seen but rather a primer for the entire Ridley-verse as a whole. This ambitious behemoth was to be the Origin of Species for all of Ridley Scott’s visionary futuristic works. The studio launched one of the largest and most complicated viral marketing campaigns I have ever seen. They filmed and released phony TED talks, visual e-mails, investment portfolios for fictional corporations, product profiles, videos outlining the advantages of current model year artificial humanoids… the list goes on.  Truly this was to be one of the most momentous events in recent filmmaking.

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What happened? The movie basically flopped, not even making back it’s $130 million dollar budget domestically, and those that DID see it (myself included) came away confused and disappointed with what they had just experienced. So I ask again: What happened?

Damon. Lindelof.

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I hate Damon Lindelof. I hate Damon Lindelof so much that the reason I asked to be added to this blog my brother and sister had been running was specifically to write and post a piece entitled “Damon Lindelof is the Herpes of the Film Industry.” I hate Damon Lindelof so much that it actually noticeably affects how much I LOVE J.J. Abrams – a man whom I plan to name my first-born son after – for having giving him his initial break writing for the show LOST. Damon Lindelof is a man who has literally said, “People hate getting answers.” No, Damon, they hate YOUR answers because you are a no talent hack who couldn’t write a satisfying conclusion if your shiny little head depended on it. But I digress… 

Damon Lindelof, being the bright and shiny man of the moment, was brought on as the head writer and executive producer for the film. His function was (or at least very much SHOULD have been) as kind of a script doctor/story polisher for the unquestionable genius of Ridley Scott who had already developed the entire story in his mind. However as the process went on, Damon pushed and changed and warped the story more, somehow convincing the aging director that ‘less is more’ and they could seek true exposition and resolution in the sequel. This is of course without the consideration that if they leave too many open questions – and thus empty seats – they might never make it to a sequel. So how did Prometheus go from a disappointing, open-ended cinema experience to one of my favorite, most analyzed, and deeply interesting films? The answer is a little research and Prometheus: Giftbearer.

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Giftbearer is a FanEdit by an Internet user called Severian. In this recut he has completely overhauled the original film to address some of it biggest weaknesses. He added nearly 15 minutes of bonus footage compiled from the deleted scenes, viral videos, and the online marketing site. He also re-sequenced several scenes, cut out superfluous or impossible actions, and reduced unnecessary or redundant character development/flaw exposition to create an overall more engaging and cohesive narrative experience. Basically he de-lindelof’d the film as much as humanly possible. 

What is honestly mind blowing to me is that these added scenes existed and were not included in the theatrical release to begin with. For example in Giftbearer there is a scene between Vickers and Janek (which is perhaps the best scene for the limitless Idris Elba in the entire movie) that POINT FOR POINT, NOTE FOR NOTE explains the complication and plot of the situation that they are experiencing. It answers SO MANY QUESTIONS that lingered and ruined the movie for so many people. AND THEY SHOT IT! THEY HAD IT! They had that scene and withheld the resolution from the viewer ON PURPOSE. Who does that sound like to you?

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They’ve announced Prometheus 2 (finally and awesomely) so it looks like we’ll finally get those answers we were looking for. In FACT not only have they announced that Prometheus 2 is coming free from Lindelof’s interference but they have employed Michael Green to write it. For those of you tragically uninformed: Michael Green is the creator, writer, and producer of the single greatest television show of all time Kings. I know, you’ve never heard of it. But this was a show, a modernization of King David’s tale that was literally and explicitly cancelled for being “too smart for television.” NBC decided to cancel the show as it reached the “wrong demographic” of informed and intelligent viewers. Had this show been on HBO or AMC it would have run six seasons. It’s available on Amazon and I dare you to watch just the first episode and tell me it isn’t the most compelling television you’ve ever seen. BUT I DIGRESS AGAIN!

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I’ve gone too long to actually get into the story of Prometheus in this post but rest assured it’s coming. Take this time to download Prometheus: Giftbearer and watch it for yourself. Because soon I’ll be back to tell you about the story that you never saw and the world that it created. 

-Andrew